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New research from the Transforming Maternity Care Collaborative Team

Collectively, the Transforming Maternity Care Collaborative generate a large volume of high quality, impactful research. This week has seen the publication of five new papers from our team members in the Women and Birth journal. You can access the full text of each of these via the links below. Settle in with a cuppa and enjoy getting up to date.

Intrapartum CTG monitoring does not improve perinatal outcomes.

Authors: Dr Kirsten Small, Associate Professor Mary Sidebotham, Professor Jennifer Fenwick, Professor Jenny Gamble.

This systematic literature review identified all randomised controlled trials and non-experimental evidence which has examined whether the use of CTG monitoring during labour rather than intermittent auscultation reduces perinatal mortality or cerebral palsy rates in babies born to women considered to be at high risk. No improvement in mortality was found, while an increase in the cerebral palsy rate was noted when CTG monitoring was used during preterm labour.

“High-quality research is urgently required to identify which women, if any, obtain a perinatal benefit from intrapartum CTG monitoring.”

Access this paper here.

Measuring midwifery students’ experiences of learning in clinical practice environments.

Authors: Ms Marnie Griffiths, Professor Jennifer Fenwick, Professor Jenny Gamble, Professor Debra Creedy.

Learning in a clinical environment is a key component of a comprehensive midwifery education program. Being able to measure how well specific learning environments support midwifery students as they develop the knowledge and skills required for professional practice is important. This paper reports on the development and testing of the MidSTEP tool which offers a robust way to capture students’ perceptions of the clinical practice component of their degree. Students indicated high level support for the statements that the clinical environment supported their learning, enabled them to work across the full scope of practice, and fostered a self-directed approach to learning.

Access this paper here.

Placing students in the driver’s seat.

Authors: Ms Valerie Hamilton, Professor Kathleen Baird, Professor Jennifer Fenwick

This research reports on students’ experiences of learning to provide midwifery care in a student-led midwifery clinic providing antenatal and postnatal care. Students who were on-call for individual women were supported to provide antenatal and postnatal care under the supervision and guidance of their university practice lecturer. “Being in the driver’s seat” was the major theme of the findings, with students reporting a sense of being in control and feeling like “a real midwife”. Students described growing in confidence over time and feeling competent to step into practice.

Access this paper here.

Stepping from student to employment through simulated employment interviews.